16/4/2014 . 27,984 notes . Reblog

vegan-yums:

Plants are not conscious.
Plants do not feel pain.
Plants lack a central nervous system. 
Plants lack sentience.
Animals are sentient beings.
Comparing eating plants with eating animals is laughable and if you’re sticking up for “plant rights” you eat both things, without plants you would die. Take a long look at your life. 

This has been a PSA (◡‿◡✿)

15/4/2014 . 600 notes . Reblog

vegan-yums:

Deliciously Cheezy Vegan Pizza Scrolls (Bread Rolls) / Recipe

Man I don’t even live pizza, but I’m going to try this.

15/4/2014 . 11,706 notes . Reblog

Anonymous asked: I'm sorry, but if you think Bees are harming our environment then you really need to rethink things. Just because a website, that is openly against bees and honey, says something without doing research outside of that said website doesn't mean its right. There are beekeepers who don't even use the bees for profit but just keep them so they have a home and don't form a hive that's going to need to be removed anyway.

fightingforanimals:

I suggest you read that post again. Nobody said that bees are harming the environment, they said the emphasis is put on domesticated honeybees because they earn a profit for humans, rather than wild bees who are actually better for the environment, better pollinators, and are dying out partly due to domestic bees.

Also, if you read the post, you’ll see that OP said there was a difference between keeping bees in order to care for them without taking things away or expecting a profit from them, and keeping bees purely to earn money. Seriously. Read the post. You are coming in to this blindly and not knowing what you are talking about.

Considering you choose to dismiss the sources within the website I provided, which include scholarly articles and books, I will take the time to find you additional scientific sources.

Managed honeybees linked to new diseases in wild bees

Diseases that are common in managed honeybee colonies are now widespread in the UK’s wild bumblebees, according to research published in Nature. The study suggests that some diseases are being driven into wild bumblebee populations from managed honeybees. 

Dr Fürst, from the School of Biological Sciences at Royal Holloway, said: “Wild and managed bees are in decline at national and global scales. Given their central role in pollinating wildflowers and crops, it is essential that we understand what lies behind these declines. Our results suggest that emerging diseases, spread from managed bees, may be an important cause of wild bee decline.

Dr Fürst explained: “One of the novel aspects of our study is that we show that deformed wing virus, which is one of the main causes of honeybee deaths worldwide, is not only broadly present in bumblebees, but is actually replicating inside them. This means that it is acting as a real disease; they are not just carriers.”

The researchers also looked at how the diseases spread and studied genetic similarities between DWV in different pollinator populations. Three factors suggest that honeybees are spreading the parasites into wild bumblebees: honeybees have higher background levels of the virus and the fungus than bumblebees; bumblebee infection is predicted by patterns of honeybee infection; and honeybees and bumblebees at the same sites share genetic strains of DWV.

"We have known for a long time that parasites are behind declines in honeybees," said Professor Brown. "What our data show is that these same pathogens are circulating widely across our wild and managed pollinators. Infected honeybees can leave traces of disease, like a fungal spore or virus particle, on the flowers that they visit and these may then infect wild bees.

Professor Brown added: “National societies and agencies, both in the UK and globally, currently manage so-called honeybee diseases on the basis that they are a threat only to honeybees. While they are doing great work, our research shows that this premise is not true, and that the picture is much more complex. Policies to manage these diseases need to take into account threats to wild pollinators and be designed to reduce the impact of these diseases not just on managed honeybees, but on our wild bumblebees too.

Wild bees are better pollinators 

"The findings suggest that protecting wild native bees and their habitat could play a crucial role in ensuring adequate pollination for a host of important crops. 

"Up until now, we’ve thought that honey bees alone were doing most of the pollination," said Sarah Greenleaf, a postdoctoral researcher in plant pathology at UC Davis and the study’s lead author. "But now we know that a lot of honey-bee pollination happens because of their interaction with wild native bees. This means that wild bees are much, much more important than we previously thought.

In fields where wild bees were rare, a single visit by a honey bee produced an average of three seeds. But as wild bee numbers increased, so did the number of seeds produced per honey bee visit, up to an average of 15 seeds per visit. This was the case when either the richness of the species mix of wild bees increased, or when the absolute number of wild bees increased.

Growers can throw more and more honey bees out there, but they’re not going to get more pollination if the bees visit only one of the cultivars,” Kremen said. “Wild bees make the honey bees more skittish so they move more frequently between the different cultivars. Each time they move, they have the possibility of transporting the pollen between the rows.”

Wild bees contribute more than honeybees

"Bumblebees, solitary bees and other wild pollinating insects are much more important for pollinating UK crops than previously thought, say researchers.

They found that honeybee populations have nose-dived so dramatically in recent years that they can only do half as much pollination as they did in the early 1980s.

Where honeybees used to provide around 70 per cent of the UK’s pollination needs they now only pollinate a third. At worst, that figure could well be more like 10 to 15 per cent.

'Bumblebees, hoverflies and red mason bees are key wild pollinators, but there are at least 250 bee species alone in the UK, which we thought almost certainly contribute more than honeybees do,' Breeze says.

Additional differences:

Honeybees do not trip alfalfa flowers (as the Alfalfa leafcutter bees and the Alkali bees do). Honeybees cannot use the buzz pollination (the vigorous vibration used by bumblebees) necessary to efficiently pollinate tomatoes, eggplants, potatoes, peppers, blueberries, watermelon, and cranberries. Honeybees cannot fly at low temperatures (like the orchard mason bee) to efficiently pollinate early-spring blooms like blueberries, the first apple bloom and almonds. This is not to imply that honeybees are not used to pollinate these crops, just that other insects could do a much better job.

15/4/2014 . 95 notes . Reblog
strangelybeautifulworld:

nympherret:

like how much more obvious does this need to be made for people to get it?

this isnt even an exaggeration 
like at all

strangelybeautifulworld:

nympherret:

like how much more obvious does this need to be made for people to get it?

this isnt even an exaggeration 

like at all

15/4/2014 . 160,678 notes . Reblog

midnight-pursona:

"Your too fat."

"I didn’t know [insert character] was black!"

"Why don’t you do more black cosplays?"

"Cosplay to your size!"

"I don’t think that looks right on you, why don’t you cosplay [insert character] instead?"

"Why is [insert character] black? They’re not black in the show."

"You shouldn’t cross-play, it looks weird on you."

"Your boobs are too big for [insert character]."

To everyone who as ever posted a comment or question like this, my answer:

I am a black plus size female cosplayer, if you don’t like it… well honestly I don’t care. The more you comment like an idiot, the more it feeds my will power to prove I’m an amazing cosplayer, not matter what you say. I may have days, or even weeks when I feel down about myself, but that will never stop me from doing what I love. I may have large boobs, chubby stomach, double chin, hair on my face, dark spots around my face and body, and a flat butt, but I rock any cosplay I put on. So grow up, and get out of my face. <3

Too fabulous. 

15/4/2014 . 16,565 notes . Reblog
15/4/2014 . 6,160 notes . Reblog

vegasmo:

the-little-fucks-we-are:

vegasmo:

onlysaiyan:

vegasmo:

Every time you buy a burger just remember that all the world’s rainforests are being cut down to make room for more pastures and also that you are an asshole.

you do realize habitats are also cut down to make room for farms where vegetables come from

(sources) Most of which are fed to cattle.

it pisses me of when i see this shit who gives a fuck what other people eat or dont eat dam just stop judging people about everything

You people are all still crying over petty matters and not the fact the entire planet is being destroyed because of people like you, carnists are so funny in their tiny little worlds where their actions don’t affect anything but themselves.

15/4/2014 . 318 notes . Reblog
veganuniversity:

brbgoingvegan:

havocados:

preservewildlife:

According to this FB post, this is this hunter’s ‘training method.’ This is horribly sadistic and cruel. I wonder how many hunters do this?

the fucking smile wow

Literal monster. The human, I mean.

What the actual fuck

veganuniversity:

brbgoingvegan:

havocados:

preservewildlife:

According to this FB post, this is this hunter’s ‘training method.’ This is horribly sadistic and cruel. I wonder how many hunters do this?

the fucking smile wow

Literal monster. The human, I mean.

What the actual fuck

15/4/2014 . 20 notes . Reblog

veganvibez:

FRIENDS, NOT FOOD

15/4/2014 . 146,428 notes . Reblog